The Great Mental Belly Flop

Sam's personal internet hoarding space set aside for the posting of profound and interesting things found 'round the web dealing with social justice, psychology, music and the potentially devastating consequences of enabling people to indulge in bad habits on the internet. But actually it's just pop culture references and procrastination.

September 16, 2014 10:33 pm 10:32 pm
dduane:

plainanddryjokes:

Okay, this is awesome.

From ctrayn, 2012…

dduane:

plainanddryjokes:

Okay, this is awesome.

From ctrayn, 2012…

(via madmaudlingoes)

10:32 pm

macromvontus:

applebottomclaudiajeans:

capekalaska:

killdeercheer:

sizvideos:

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Ruins Your Zombie Fantasies Forever - Video

Love this bit

"just sayin’"

He’s thought about it though. One of the greatest minds of our generation sat down one day and was like “wait, could zombies exist?” And then he did the science thing and was like “nah we’re good.”

Okay so he in this case has only disproven the possibility of the actual undead. There is a possibility of a virus.

(via amiortheotherscrazy)

10:30 pm 10:30 pm
"Never stop loving people unconditionally."
10:30 pm 10:30 pm

heartscale:

i can’t believe quizilla is shutting down… now how am i supposed to find out what anime elemental girl i am or who my yu-gi-oh boyfriend is

(via havanagilahava)

10:30 pm
brainstatic:

historical-nonfiction:

A Pythagorean cup looks like a normal drinking cup, except that the bowl has a central column in it. It was supposedly invented by Pythagoras of Samos (yes, that one). It allows the user to fill the cup with wine up to a certain level. If the user fills only to that level, the imbiber may enjoy a drink in peace. If, however, the user gets greedy, the cup dumps all the wine into the unfortunate victim’s lap.

Pythagoras sounds like a real asshole.

brainstatic:

historical-nonfiction:

A Pythagorean cup looks like a normal drinking cup, except that the bowl has a central column in it. It was supposedly invented by Pythagoras of Samos (yes, that one). It allows the user to fill the cup with wine up to a certain level. If the user fills only to that level, the imbiber may enjoy a drink in peace. If, however, the user gets greedy, the cup dumps all the wine into the unfortunate victim’s lap.

Pythagoras sounds like a real asshole.

(Source: Wikipedia, via madmaudlingoes)

10:28 pm
schnibbledibble:

me back when I had my priorities sorted out

schnibbledibble:

me back when I had my priorities sorted out

(via havanagilahava)

10:01 pm
knowledgeequalsblackpower:

cartoonpolitics:

A new report has found that proposed textbooks for Texas students are inaccurate, biased and politicized .. (story here)

Keep in mind, the Texas books determine the textbooks of many other states. The findings:

A number of government and world history textbooks exaggerate Judeo-Christian influence on the nation’s founding and Western political tradition.
Two government textbooks include misleading information that undermines the Constitutional concept of the separation of church and state.
Several world history and world geography textbooks include biased statements that inappropriately portray Islam and Muslims negatively.
All of the world geography textbooks inaccurately downplay the role that conquest played in the spread of Christianity.
Several world geography and history textbooks suffer from an incomplete – and often inaccurate – account of religions other than Christianity.
Coverage of key Christian concepts and historical events are lacking in a few textbooks, often due to the assumption that all students are Christians and already familiar with Christian events and doctrine.
A few government and U.S. history textbooks suffer from an uncritical celebration of the free enterprise system, both by ignoring legitimate problems that exist in capitalism and failing to include coverage of government’s role in the U.S. economic system.
One government textbook flirts with contemporary Tea Party ideology, particularly regarding the inclusion of anti-taxation and anti-regulation arguments.
One world history textbook includes outdated – and possibly offensive – anthropological categories and racial terminology in describing African civilization.
A number of U.S. history textbooks evidence a general lack of attention to Native American peoples and culture and occasionally include biased or misleading information.
One government textbook … includes a biased – verging on offensive – treatment of affirmative action.
Most U.S. history textbooks do a poor job of covering the history of LGBT citizens in discussions of efforts to achieve civil rights in this country.
Elements of the Texas curriculum standards give undue legitimacy to neo-Confederate arguments about “states’ rights” and the legacy of slavery in the South. While most publishers avoid problems with these issues, passages in a few U.S. history and government textbooks give a nod to these misleading arguments.

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

cartoonpolitics:

A new report has found that proposed textbooks for Texas students are inaccurate, biased and politicized .. (story here)

Keep in mind, the Texas books determine the textbooks of many other states. The findings:

  • A number of government and world history textbooks exaggerate Judeo-Christian influence on the nation’s founding and Western political tradition.
  • Two government textbooks include misleading information that undermines the Constitutional concept of the separation of church and state.
  • Several world history and world geography textbooks include biased statements that inappropriately portray Islam and Muslims negatively.
  • All of the world geography textbooks inaccurately downplay the role that conquest played in the spread of Christianity.
  • Several world geography and history textbooks suffer from an incomplete – and often inaccurate – account of religions other than Christianity.
  • Coverage of key Christian concepts and historical events are lacking in a few textbooks, often due to the assumption that all students are Christians and already familiar with Christian events and doctrine.
  • A few government and U.S. history textbooks suffer from an uncritical celebration of the free enterprise system, both by ignoring legitimate problems that exist in capitalism and failing to include coverage of government’s role in the U.S. economic system.
  • One government textbook flirts with contemporary Tea Party ideology, particularly regarding the inclusion of anti-taxation and anti-regulation arguments.
  • One world history textbook includes outdated – and possibly offensive – anthropological categories and racial terminology in describing African civilization.
  • A number of U.S. history textbooks evidence a general lack of attention to Native American peoples and culture and occasionally include biased or misleading information.
  • One government textbook … includes a biased – verging on offensive – treatment of affirmative action.
  • Most U.S. history textbooks do a poor job of covering the history of LGBT citizens in discussions of efforts to achieve civil rights in this country.
  • Elements of the Texas curriculum standards give undue legitimacy to neo-Confederate arguments about “states’ rights” and the legacy of slavery in the South. While most publishers avoid problems with these issues, passages in a few U.S. history and government textbooks give a nod to these misleading arguments.

(via wrathoftheragingdemon)